Historic Food at Gallery Openings!

Recently I attended the opening of “All in a Day’s Work: Industry and Growth in Old Town” at the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse, fantastically curated by three friends from my MMSt program at University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information: Dylan Dammermann, Jennifer Ford, and Alyssa Lake, in collaboration with the Ontario Heritage Trust.

“Working life wasn’t easy in Old Town Toronto. Hours were long, pay was low and workplaces could be dangerous. Between 1870 and 1910, the neighbourhood boomed with factories and workshops, where men, women and children worked. Through family stories, photographs and artifacts, “All in a Day’s Work: Industry and Growth in Old Town”  sheds light on life inside Old Town Toronto’s stores, factories and homes during this time – exploring the industrial transformation of Toronto’s oldest neighbourhood.”Read More »

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How 20th c. Canadian Cookbooks Both Wrote & Erased History

Selected Recipes:
Tomato Soup Cake w Cream Cheese Frosting
Cheddar Shorties
Manoomin

The 20th century saw many periods of change (flavoured with surprisingly persistent continuity). One of the biggest catalysts for change was of course, the wartime period. Looking at repositories of wartime recipes is a fascinating glimpse of how Canadian Cookery and home life changed. However, I also learned that while cookbooks are a unique method to illuminate history, they can also actively erase important histories as well. Read More »

A Fine Mess: 18th c. Upper Canada

Selected Recipes:
Chocolate Cream
Shrewsbury Cakes

Canada Part 1: 18th c. Upper Canada

This term I shall explore Canadian Cuisine, in three parts.

Firstly, I would like to say that yes! Such a thing as Canadian Cuisine does exist. This country has a huge variety of regionally uniquebeloved, and sometimes iconically controversial food items. Unfortunately, Canada has long fought against bad stereotypes or a disbelief in good cuisine. Colonel Sanders famously loathed Canadian food, calling it “plumb tasteless!” This series shall feature Canadian recipes of the late 18th and early 19th centuries in this post, and followed by posts exploring the 19th and 20th centuries.Read More »